Trumpsculinity

25411_377602423466_5440934_nIn her last essay on the new politics of masculinity and migration, Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo, sociology professor at the University of Southern California (USC), wrote that the current presidential election in the US has an extraordinary dynamic, as one of the most important discursive categories is (traditional) masculinity, supported by misogyny and xenophobia, which at certain point dominated Trump’s campaign (Hondagneu-Sotelo 2016). As a critical men and masculinities scholar, I couldn’t agree more, since everything that I’ve read, seen and heard from and about the (American) male electorate in the last few months has led me to the conclusion that Trump’s masculinity is a crucial factor influencing the election results. Continue reading

International Conference “Gender, Power, Eastern Europe – Changing Concepts of Femininities and Masculinities and Power Relations”

jazzyberlinDr. Justyna Stypinska, an excellent scholar  and a very good friend of mine, together with her colleagues from the Institute for East European Studies, would like to invite you to take part in the International Conference entitled “Gender, Power, Eastern Europe – Changing Concepts of Femininities and Masculinities and Power Relations” to be held at Free University in Berlin, Germany, 20-23 June 2017. Continue reading

CFP: Special Issue of NORMA:International Journal for Masculinity Studies

normaThe Guest Editors of the Special Issue of NORMA: International Journal for Masculinity Studies on “Men and Migration in Europe and beyond” warmly welcome scholarly contributions from researchers working on the issues pertaining to the international migration and mobilities, critical men and and masculinities studies. This special issue aims at collecting and broadening the scholarly knowledge on the issues concentrated on the presence of male migrants in the receiving societies.

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Teaching intersectionality in inter- sectional settings

gottoIntersectionality and intersectional theories are currently some of the most important and influential theoretical, methodological and pedagogical approaches within sociology and other social sciences, especially in their critical approach. According to the most common understanding, intersectionality is not only a theory but most of all an analytical tool that “(…) provides a framework for explaining how social divisions of race, gender, age, and citizenship status, among others, positions people differently in the world, especially in relation to global social inequality” (Hill Collins & Bilge 2016: 15). Therefore, teaching sociology students how to use this tool seems to be a very important task. However, because understanding the entire spectrum of the intersectional approach is rather complex, and even among experienced researchers some misunderstandings and simplifications occur (Naples 2009), teaching intersectionality to undergraduate and graduate students can be both beneficial and challenging and strongly depends on a) teacher expertise and auto-reflexivity, and b) the composition of the student group and the level of heterogeneity. Continue reading